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Discover the sumptuous details of the Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel!

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Cuirassier from the 7th Regiment by Auguste-Marie TAUNAY

Representing the various arms of the Grande Armée in their respective uniforms (Infantry, Artillery, Engineers, Cavalry), these bold and grandiose effigies are easily recognizable by the shape of their helmets, boots and uniforms. They were made by the greatest sculptors of the day, some of whom won the Grand Prix de Sculpture. They worked from very detailed drawings by the painter Charles Meynier, who had access to the large collection of engravings and copies assembled by Dominique-Vivant Denon. It was Napoleon himself who chose which regiments would be featured and honored. Strikingly realistic, these statues scandalized the members of the Institut de France due to the abundance of clothing details considered to be trivial as well as their very subject: ordinary soldiers.

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Dragoon by Charles Louis CORBET

Representing the various arms of the Grande Armée in their respective uniforms (Infantry, Artillery, Engineers, Cavalry), these bold and grandiose effigies are easily recognizable by the shape of their helmets, boots and uniforms. They were made by the greatest sculptors of the day, some of whom won the Grand Prix de Sculpture. They worked from very detailed drawings by the painter Charles Meynier, who had access to the large collection of engravings and copies assembled by Dominique-Vivant Denon. It was Napoleon himself who chose which regiments would be featured and honored. Strikingly realistic, these statues scandalized the members of the Institut de France due to the abundance of clothing details considered to be trivial as well as their very subject: ordinary soldiers.

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Chasseur on Horseback by Jean-Joseph FOUCOU

Representing the various arms of the Grande Armée in their respective uniforms (Infantry, Artillery, Engineers, Cavalry), these bold and grandiose effigies are easily recognizable by the shape of their helmets, boots and uniforms. They were made by the greatest sculptors of the day, some of whom won the Grand Prix de Sculpture. They worked from very detailed drawings by the painter Charles Meynier, who had access to the large collection of engravings and copies assembled by Dominique-Vivant Denon. It was Napoleon himself who chose which regiments would be featured and honored. Strikingly realistic, these statues scandalized the members of the Institut de France due to the abundance of clothing details considered to be trivial as well as their very subject: ordinary soldiers.

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Grenadier on Horseback by Joseph CHINARD

Representing the various arms of the Grande Armée in their respective uniforms (Infantry, Artillery, Engineers, Cavalry), these bold and grandiose effigies are easily recognizable by the shape of their helmets, boots and uniforms. They were made by the greatest sculptors of the day, some of whom won the Grand Prix de Sculpture. They worked from very detailed drawings by the painter Charles Meynier, who had access to the large collection of engravings and copies assembled by Dominique-Vivant Denon. It was Napoleon himself who chose which regiments would be featured and honored. Strikingly realistic, these statues scandalized the members of the Institut de France due to the abundance of clothing details considered to be trivial as well as their very subject: ordinary soldiers.

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Allegory of Peace by François-Frédéric LEMOT

In 1808, the Horses of Saint Mark, which had been taken in Venice by the revolutionary armies during the First Italian Campaign, were placed atop the arch. This was joined by the allegories of Victory and Peace by the sculptor Lemot. However, the sculpted decoration of the arch would go on to evolve with the political upheavals of the 19th century. Thus, in 1815, with the fall of the Empire, the Horses of Saint Mark returned to Italy. In 1827, the sculptor Bosio was appointed by Charles X to create a new quadriga, cast by Charles Crozatier, inspired by its prestigious ancient predecessor. The ensemble is led by a female figure, the allegory of Restoration, accompanied by the original allegories by Lemot.

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Allegory of Victory by François-Frédéric LEMOT

In 1808, the Horses of Saint Mark, which had been taken in Venice by the revolutionary armies during the First Italian Campaign, were placed atop the arch. This was joined by the allegories of Victory and Peace by the sculptor Lemot. However, the sculpted decoration of the arch would go on to evolve with the political upheavals of the 19th century. Thus, in 1815, with the fall of the Empire, the Horses of Saint Mark returned to Italy. In 1827, the sculptor Bosio was appointed by Charles X to create a new quadriga, cast by Charles Crozatier, inspired by its prestigious ancient predecessor. The ensemble is led by a female figure, the allegory of Restoration, accompanied by the original allegories by Lemot.

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Horses by François-Joseph BOSIO

In 1808, the Horses of Saint Mark, which had been taken in Venice by the revolutionary armies during the First Italian Campaign, were placed atop the arch. This was joined by the allegories of Victory and Peace by the sculptor Lemot. However, the sculpted decoration of the arch would go on to evolve with the political upheavals of the 19th century. Thus, in 1815, with the fall of the Empire, the Horses of Saint Mark returned to Italy. In 1827, the sculptor Bosio was appointed by Charles X to create a new quadriga, cast by Charles Crozatier, inspired by its prestigious ancient predecessor. The ensemble is led by a female figure, the allegory of Restoration, accompanied by the original allegories by Lemot.

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Allegory of Restoration by François-Joseph BOSIO

In 1808, the Horses of Saint Mark, which had been taken in Venice by the revolutionary armies during the First Italian Campaign, were placed atop the arch. This was joined by the allegories of Victory and Peace by the sculptor Lemot. However, the sculpted decoration of the arch would go on to evolve with the political upheavals of the 19th century. Thus, in 1815, with the fall of the Empire, the Horses of Saint Mark returned to Italy. In 1827, the sculptor Bosio was appointed by Charles X to create a new quadriga, cast by Charles Crozatier, inspired by its prestigious ancient predecessor. The ensemble is led by a female figure, the allegory of Restoration, accompanied by the original allegories by Lemot.

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Coat of Arms of the French Empire by Auguste Félix FORTIN

The arch is decorated on all four sides with reliefs illustrating the Austrian campaign of 1805. The selection of episodes depicted certainly marks a desire to glorify the Emperor's military conquests, but through the lens of peace: rather than the battle scenes we see the peaceful episodes that concluded them: the calm of treaties rather than the aggression of military engagements. Even the great victory of Austerlitz is evoked by post-battle negotiations. The sculptors worked from models drawn by the painter Charles Meynier and strictly respected the principles of classical bas-relief, as taught at the École des Beaux-Arts—all the characters' heads are at the same level, on the same line. Only the planes that are absolutely necessary are used, and emphasis is placed on the key characters, the attitudes of which are calm and noble, with eloquent body language. A highly effective narrative device, these reliefs managed to immortalize the tumultuous current affairs of the day in stone.

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Coat of Arms of Italy by Antoine François GERARD

The arch is decorated on all four sides with reliefs illustrating the Austrian campaign of 1805. The selection of episodes depicted certainly marks a desire to glorify the Emperor's military conquests, but through the lens of peace: rather than the battle scenes we see the peaceful episodes that concluded them: the calm of treaties rather than the aggression of military engagements. Even the great victory of Austerlitz is evoked by post-battle negotiations. The sculptors worked from models drawn by the painter Charles Meynier and strictly respected the principles of classical bas-relief, as taught at the École des Beaux-Arts—all the characters' heads are at the same level, on the same line. Only the planes that are absolutely necessary are used, and emphasis is placed on the key characters, the attitudes of which are calm and noble, with eloquent body language. A highly effective narrative device, these reliefs managed to immortalize the tumultuous current affairs of the day in stone.

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Genuses Supporting Laurel Garlands by Auguste-Marie TAUNAY

The arch is decorated on all four sides with reliefs illustrating the Austrian campaign of 1805. The selection of episodes depicted certainly marks a desire to glorify the Emperor's military conquests, but through the lens of peace: rather than the battle scenes we see the peaceful episodes that concluded them: the calm of treaties rather than the aggression of military engagements. Even the great victory of Austerlitz is evoked by post-battle negotiations. The sculptors worked from models drawn by the painter Charles Meynier and strictly respected the principles of classical bas-relief, as taught at the École des Beaux-Arts—all the characters' heads are at the same level, on the same line. Only the planes that are absolutely necessary are used, and emphasis is placed on the key characters, the attitudes of which are calm and noble, with eloquent body language. A highly effective narrative device, these reliefs managed to immortalize the tumultuous current affairs of the day in stone.

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Surrender of Ulm by Pierre CARTELLIER

The arch is decorated on all four sides with reliefs illustrating the Austrian campaign of 1805. The selection of episodes depicted certainly marks a desire to glorify the Emperor's military conquests, but through the lens of peace: rather than the battle scenes we see the peaceful episodes that concluded them: the calm of treaties rather than the aggression of military engagements. Even the great victory of Austerlitz is evoked by post-battle negotiations. The sculptors worked from models drawn by the painter Charles Meynier and strictly respected the principles of classical bas-relief, as taught at the École des Beaux-Arts—all the characters' heads are at the same level, on the same line. Only the planes that are absolutely necessary are used, and emphasis is placed on the key characters, the attitudes of which are calm and noble, with eloquent body language. A highly effective narrative device, these reliefs managed to immortalize the tumultuous current affairs of the day in stone.

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Making Peace After the Battle of Austerlitz by Jean-Joseph ESPERCIEUX

The arch is decorated on all four sides with reliefs illustrating the Austrian campaign of 1805. The selection of episodes depicted certainly marks a desire to glorify the Emperor's military conquests, but through the lens of peace: rather than the battle scenes we see the peaceful episodes that concluded them: the calm of treaties rather than the aggression of military engagements. Even the great victory of Austerlitz is evoked by post-battle negotiations. The sculptors worked from models drawn by the painter Charles Meynier and strictly respected the principles of classical bas-relief, as taught at the École des Beaux-Arts—all the characters' heads are at the same level, on the same line. Only the planes that are absolutely necessary are used, and emphasis is placed on the key characters, the attitudes of which are calm and noble, with eloquent body language. A highly effective narrative device, these reliefs managed to immortalize the tumultuous current affairs of the day in stone.

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Two Allegories by Antoine-Léonard DUPASQUIER

The arch is decorated on all four sides with reliefs illustrating the Austrian campaign of 1805. The selection of episodes depicted certainly marks a desire to glorify the Emperor's military conquests, but through the lens of peace: rather than the battle scenes we see the peaceful episodes that concluded them: the calm of treaties rather than the aggression of military engagements. Even the great victory of Austerlitz is evoked by post-battle negotiations. The sculptors worked from models drawn by the painter Charles Meynier and strictly respected the principles of classical bas-relief, as taught at the École des Beaux-Arts—all the characters' heads are at the same level, on the same line. Only the planes that are absolutely necessary are used, and emphasis is placed on the key characters, the attitudes of which are calm and noble, with eloquent body language. A highly effective narrative device, these reliefs managed to immortalize the tumultuous current affairs of the day in stone.

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Trophies of Arms by François (?) MONTPELLIR

The arch is decorated on all four sides with reliefs illustrating the Austrian campaign of 1805. The selection of episodes depicted certainly marks a desire to glorify the Emperor's military conquests, but through the lens of peace: rather than the battle scenes we see the peaceful episodes that concluded them: the calm of treaties rather than the aggression of military engagements. Even the great victory of Austerlitz is evoked by post-battle negotiations. The sculptors worked from models drawn by the painter Charles Meynier and strictly respected the principles of classical bas-relief, as taught at the École des Beaux-Arts—all the characters' heads are at the same level, on the same line. Only the planes that are absolutely necessary are used, and emphasis is placed on the key characters, the attitudes of which are calm and noble, with eloquent body language. A highly effective narrative device, these reliefs managed to immortalize the tumultuous current affairs of the day in stone.

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The Peace of Pressburg by Jacques-Philippe LESUEUR

Representing the various arms of the Grande Armée in their respective uniforms (Infantry, Artillery, Engineers, Cavalry), these bold and grandiose effigies are easily recognizable by the shape of their helmets, boots and uniforms. They were made by the greatest sculptors of the day, some of whom won the Grand Prix de Sculpture. They worked from very detailed drawings by the painter Charles Meynier, who had access to the large collection of engravings and copies assembled by Dominique-Vivant Denon. It was Napoleon himself who chose which regiments would be featured and honored. Strikingly realistic, these statues scandalized the members of the Institut de France due to the abundance of clothing details considered to be trivial as well as their very subject: ordinary soldiers.

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Grenadier of the Line Infantry by Robert-Guillaume DARDEL

Representing the various arms of the Grande Armée in their respective uniforms (Infantry, Artillery, Engineers, Cavalry), these bold and grandiose effigies are easily recognizable by the shape of their helmets, boots and uniforms. They were made by the greatest sculptors of the day, some of whom won the Grand Prix de Sculpture. They worked from very detailed drawings by the painter Charles Meynier, who had access to the large collection of engravings and copies assembled by Dominique-Vivant Denon. It was Napoleon himself who chose which regiments would be featured and honored. Strikingly realistic, these statues scandalized the members of the Institut de France due to the abundance of clothing details considered to be trivial as well as their very subject: ordinary soldiers.

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Carabinier of the Light Infantry by Antoine MOUTON

Representing the various arms of the Grande Armée in their respective uniforms (Infantry, Artillery, Engineers, Cavalry), these bold and grandiose effigies are easily recognizable by the shape of their helmets, boots and uniforms. They were made by the greatest sculptors of the day, some of whom won the Grand Prix de Sculpture. They worked from very detailed drawings by the painter Charles Meynier, who had access to the large collection of engravings and copies assembled by Dominique-Vivant Denon. It was Napoleon himself who chose which regiments would be featured and honored. Strikingly realistic, these statues scandalized the members of the Institut de France due to the abundance of clothing details considered to be trivial as well as their very subject: ordinary soldiers.

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Cannoneer of the First Regiment by Charles-Antoine BRIDAN

Representing the various arms of the Grande Armée in their respective uniforms (Infantry, Artillery, Engineers, Cavalry), these bold and grandiose effigies are easily recognizable by the shape of their helmets, boots and uniforms. They were made by the greatest sculptors of the day, some of whom won the Grand Prix de Sculpture. They worked from very detailed drawings by the painter Charles Meynier, who had access to the large collection of engravings and copies assembled by Dominique-Vivant Denon. It was Napoleon himself who chose which regiments would be featured and honored. Strikingly realistic, these statues scandalized the members of the Institut de France due to the abundance of clothing details considered to be trivial as well as their very subject: ordinary soldiers.

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Sapper of the First Regiment of the Line by Jacques-Edme DUMONT

Representing the various arms of the Grande Armée in their respective uniforms (Infantry, Artillery, Engineers, Cavalry), these bold and grandiose effigies are easily recognizable by the shape of their helmets, boots and uniforms. They were made by the greatest sculptors of the day, some of whom won the Grand Prix de Sculpture. They worked from very detailed drawings by the painter Charles Meynier, who had access to the large collection of engravings and copies assembled by Dominique-Vivant Denon. It was Napoleon himself who chose which regiments would be featured and honored. Strikingly realistic, these statues scandalized the members of the Institut de France due to the abundance of clothing details considered to be trivial as well as their very subject: ordinary soldiers.

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Coat of Arms of the French Empire by Jacques-Edme DUMONT

The arch is decorated on all four sides with reliefs illustrating the Austrian campaign of 1805. The selection of episodes depicted certainly marks a desire to glorify the Emperor's military conquests, but through the lens of peace: rather than the battle scenes we see the peaceful episodes that concluded them: the calm of treaties rather than the aggression of military engagements. Even the great victory of Austerlitz is evoked by post-battle negotiations. The sculptors worked from models drawn by the painter Charles Meynier and strictly respected the principles of classical bas-relief, as taught at the École des Beaux-Arts—all the characters' heads are at the same level, on the same line. Only the planes that are absolutely necessary are used, and emphasis is placed on the key characters, the attitudes of which are calm and noble, with eloquent body language. A highly effective narrative device, these reliefs managed to immortalize the tumultuous current affairs of the day in stone.

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Coat of Arms of Italy by Charles-Antoine CALLAMARD

The arch is decorated on all four sides with reliefs illustrating the Austrian campaign of 1805. The selection of episodes depicted certainly marks a desire to glorify the Emperor's military conquests, but through the lens of peace: rather than the battle scenes we see the peaceful episodes that concluded them: the calm of treaties rather than the aggression of military engagements. Even the great victory of Austerlitz is evoked by post-battle negotiations. The sculptors worked from models drawn by the painter Charles Meynier and strictly respected the principles of classical bas-relief, as taught at the École des Beaux-Arts—all the characters' heads are at the same level, on the same line. Only the planes that are absolutely necessary are used, and emphasis is placed on the key characters, the attitudes of which are calm and noble, with eloquent body language. A highly effective narrative device, these reliefs managed to immortalize the tumultuous current affairs of the day in stone.

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Entry into Munich by Claude MICHEL, as CLODION

The arch is decorated on all four sides with reliefs illustrating the Austrian campaign of 1805. The selection of episodes depicted certainly marks a desire to glorify the Emperor's military conquests, but through the lens of peace: rather than the battle scenes we see the peaceful episodes that concluded them: the calm of treaties rather than the aggression of military engagements. Even the great victory of Austerlitz is evoked by post-battle negotiations. The sculptors worked from models drawn by the painter Charles Meynier and strictly respected the principles of classical bas-relief, as taught at the École des Beaux-Arts—all the characters' heads are at the same level, on the same line. Only the planes that are absolutely necessary are used, and emphasis is placed on the key characters, the attitudes of which are calm and noble, with eloquent body language. A highly effective narrative device, these reliefs managed to immortalize the tumultuous current affairs of the day in stone.

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Meeting of Two Emperors by Claude RAMEY (père)

The arch is decorated on all four sides with reliefs illustrating the Austrian campaign of 1805. The selection of episodes depicted certainly marks a desire to glorify the Emperor's military conquests, but through the lens of peace: rather than the battle scenes we see the peaceful episodes that concluded them: the calm of treaties rather than the aggression of military engagements. Even the great victory of Austerlitz is evoked by post-battle negotiations. The sculptors worked from models drawn by the painter Charles Meynier and strictly respected the principles of classical bas-relief, as taught at the École des Beaux-Arts—all the characters' heads are at the same level, on the same line. Only the planes that are absolutely necessary are used, and emphasis is placed on the key characters, the attitudes of which are calm and noble, with eloquent body language. A highly effective narrative device, these reliefs managed to immortalize the tumultuous current affairs of the day in stone.

Back

Allegories by Auguste-Marie TAUNAY

The arch is decorated on all four sides with reliefs illustrating the Austrian campaign of 1805. The selection of episodes depicted certainly marks a desire to glorify the Emperor's military conquests, but through the lens of peace: rather than the battle scenes we see the peaceful episodes that concluded them: the calm of treaties rather than the aggression of military engagements. Even the great victory of Austerlitz is evoked by post-battle negotiations. The sculptors worked from models drawn by the painter Charles Meynier and strictly respected the principles of classical bas-relief, as taught at the École des Beaux-Arts—all the characters' heads are at the same level, on the same line. Only the planes that are absolutely necessary are used, and emphasis is placed on the key characters, the attitudes of which are calm and noble, with eloquent body language. A highly effective narrative device, these reliefs managed to immortalize the tumultuous current affairs of the day in stone.

Back

Trophies of Arms by François (?) MONTPELLIR

The arch is decorated on all four sides with reliefs illustrating the Austrian campaign of 1805. The selection of episodes depicted certainly marks a desire to glorify the Emperor's military conquests, but through the lens of peace: rather than the battle scenes we see the peaceful episodes that concluded them: the calm of treaties rather than the aggression of military engagements. Even the great victory of Austerlitz is evoked by post-battle negotiations. The sculptors worked from models drawn by the painter Charles Meynier and strictly respected the principles of classical bas-relief, as taught at the École des Beaux-Arts—all the characters' heads are at the same level, on the same line. Only the planes that are absolutely necessary are used, and emphasis is placed on the key characters, the attitudes of which are calm and noble, with eloquent body language. A highly effective narrative device, these reliefs managed to immortalize the tumultuous current affairs of the day in stone.

Back

Trophies of Arms by François (?) MONTPELLIR

The arch is decorated on all four sides with reliefs illustrating the Austrian campaign of 1805. The selection of episodes depicted certainly marks a desire to glorify the Emperor's military conquests, but through the lens of peace: rather than the battle scenes we see the peaceful episodes that concluded them: the calm of treaties rather than the aggression of military engagements. Even the great victory of Austerlitz is evoked by post-battle negotiations. The sculptors worked from models drawn by the painter Charles Meynier and strictly respected the principles of classical bas-relief, as taught at the École des Beaux-Arts—all the characters' heads are at the same level, on the same line. Only the planes that are absolutely necessary are used, and emphasis is placed on the key characters, the attitudes of which are calm and noble, with eloquent body language. A highly effective narrative device, these reliefs managed to immortalize the tumultuous current affairs of the day in stone.

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Entry into Vienna by Louis-Pierre DESEINE

The arch is decorated on all four sides with reliefs illustrating the Austrian campaign of 1805. The selection of episodes depicted certainly marks a desire to glorify the Emperor's military conquests, but through the lens of peace: rather than the battle scenes we see the peaceful episodes that concluded them: the calm of treaties rather than the aggression of military engagements. Even the great victory of Austerlitz is evoked by post-battle negotiations. The sculptors worked from models drawn by the painter Charles Meynier and strictly respected the principles of classical bas-relief, as taught at the École des Beaux-Arts—all the characters' heads are at the same level, on the same line. Only the planes that are absolutely necessary are used, and emphasis is placed on the key characters, the attitudes of which are calm and noble, with eloquent body language. A highly effective narrative device, these reliefs managed to immortalize the tumultuous current affairs of the day in stone.

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